Panorama experimentation - Crystal Lake Ca

David S

Well-Known Member
I will have some more later, but this is interesting, I took this from 4 shots handheld and stitched them in the Photosynth (now ICE) stitcher from MS Labs. I cut the dimensions down in half (originally was like 15000 pixels.. I also took the file size down from like 60MB to 4.5. This is from a 35mm lens, I find there's a heck of a lot of detail there for such a small lens on an APS-C sensor. Try zooming in a bit you can count the lines and formation cracks in the bigger rocks easily !! EDIT - It's SO big you probably need to click on it and then right-click and save it to your desktop, otherwise it's very unwieldy in the forums post table.. Sorry! It's just so cool to have all this detail from just 4 shots :)

 

AlanLichty

Moderator
Nice stitch job - that does expand to expose some pretty good detail.

It's frighteningly easy to create panoramas that will leave your computer gasping for air trying to process the stitched results. Photoshop reaches its limits for saving a file over 2 gigabytes so you have to pare away any and all non-visible layers to keep your work.
 

David S

Well-Known Member
Nice stitch job - that does expand to expose some pretty good detail.

It's frighteningly easy to create panoramas that will leave your computer gasping for air trying to process the stitched results. Photoshop reaches its limits for saving a file over 2 gigabytes so you have to pare away any and all non-visible layers to keep your work.
Thanks! I've totally abandoned Abode products for exactly the same reason. Bloat and slowness. I've been having really great results from Capture one for general editing and this ICE program seems like it can take gigs and gigs and keep coming :)
 

Jim Dockery

Well-Known Member
Alan, you can easily save larger than 2 gig files in Photoshop by choosing "large document format" in the save dialogue. I do find that I don't have a thumbnail for the largest files, so it makes them harder to view and sort in Bridge.
 

David S

Well-Known Member
Alan, you can easily save larger than 2 gig files in Photoshop by choosing "large document format" in the save dialogue. I do find that I don't have a thumbnail for the largest files, so it makes them harder to view and sort in Bridge.
Thanks ! That is good to know, Alas, I am free of the ABLOATY products... errr I mean ADOBE... I've never really liked the way they rendered Fuji images
 

Ken Rennie

Well-Known Member
Alan, you can easily save larger than 2 gig files in Photoshop by choosing "large document format" in the save dialogue. I do find that I don't have a thumbnail for the largest files, so it makes them harder to view and sort in Bridge.
Jim in the edit/ preferences/ thumbnails section increase the thumbnails size, 4000MB will process the largest TIFF and 10000MB will process almost anything. Ken
thumbnails.jpg
 

Ken Rennie

Well-Known Member
I still stitch most of my panoramas using lightroom and don't find it particularly slow. It allows you to input RAW files and get a fully editable RAW out at the end allowing colour balance, sharpness, exposure etc. to be adjusted in the final panorama. For very difficult multi-row panoramas I use PTGUI but that requires me to produce TIFFs before it will stitch them and this requires me to bake in various settings. Largest panorama I have available is 20,000+px wide which is a cropped version of the original. I agree David the detail that you can obtain is wonderful and I often produce a pano rather than use a very wide angle lens as you get better corner detail and little or no corner stretching. The problem is where you have close foreground objects. This shows thumbnails with 5GB images. Ken
large pano.jpg
 
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