The Recipe #51 - Golden Ratio

Ben Egbert

Forum Helper
Staff member
Ok I see how you got this by inverting the overlay . I am searching for examples in my stash. I tried one of a flying bird but it required cutting off the tail.
 

JimFox

Moderator
Staff member
I hope it’s okay to say I don’t think this fits. The lighthouse is in the start of the spiral, but the spiral just goes over empty water. To my understanding there needs to be an element along the spiral that catches and pulls the eye.

For example if the spiral wasn’t inverted and there was a layer of clouds stretching across the sky that’s where the spiral would be pulling the eyes.

When I see this very nice photo of yours Jameel, my eye goes to the lighthouse and just stays there. Nothing pulls it from the lighthouse down along the water below it.

Maybe my eye just flows differently? If anything my eye still wants to go up into the sky. Maybe don’t invert the Golden Ratio?
 

Jameel Hyder

Moderator
Staff member
Definitely OK - good to have a discussion that helps and improves our collective understanding of a topic.

My understanding based on images I have seen that exemplifies this as well as the rule of thirds is about the placement of the subject. There are examples from famous photographers such as Ansel Adams, Henri Cartier-Bresson etc. which are interesting to study.

The curve is a geometric representation of the golden ratio and has no implication about lead in the to the subject in the image. The Fibonacci sequence is a representation of the golden ratio. It has been used in architecture, graphic design and so forth.

Now having the spiral be used as a lead in a nice idea. However the overlay is here as a tool and not part of the image itself. Whether I invert the overlay or not, the image needs to stand on its own.
 

Amy Earl

Supporting Member
Very nice, Jameel.

This is the kind of image I'm searching for in my collection, one with the subject in the corner (a good challenge for me). I may also recrop one of my other photos to place the subject accordingly. Like you I understood the golden ratio to be used this way and not with elements curving in a spiral...that would indeed be interesting, though even more difficult to achieve!
 

JimFox

Moderator
Staff member
F
Definitely OK - good to have a discussion that helps and improves our collective understanding of a topic.

My understanding based on images I have seen that exemplifies this as well as the rule of thirds is about the placement of the subject. There are examples from famous photographers such as Ansel Adams, Henri Cartier-Bresson etc. which are interesting to study.

The curve is a geometric representation of the golden ratio and has no implication about lead in the to the subject in the image. The Fibonacci sequence is a representation of the golden ratio. It has been used in architecture, graphic design and so forth.

Now having the spiral be used as a lead in a nice idea. However the overlay is here as a tool and not part of the image itself. Whether I invert the overlay or not, the image needs to stand on its own.
Hey Jameel, the Spiral is not meant as a lead in, it's meant to be the path that the eye takes from the starting object to the end object. It Leads out from the starting point to the end point.

I have to ask again, what's the point of the spiral if it's not to be a path that the eye is to follow? Otherwise the Golden Ratio would simple have the start point and the end point. I am not sure what examples you have seen, but the best examples I have seen use the Spiral as a path.

I don't want to beat a dead horse with the purpose of the Spiral in the Golden Ratio, so this is the last time I will share about the point of the Spiral, at least according to my knowledge.
 
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